Research

Noella’s  research focuses on literacy teaching and learning and in particular writing  acquisition. Previous projects at the master and doctoral levels examined  issues relating to teacher professional learning, teacher morale, the status of  the teaching profession and the impact of extrinsic teaching awards on  recipients and their non-recipient colleagues. Current research projects are  focused on writing acquisition and the relationship between success with early  writing and ongoing literacy development with a particular focus on the  relationship between talking, drawing and writing.

Current and Recently Completed Projects

Memory Performance after Writing: A comparison between taking notes by handwriting and typing on a laptop or tablet (2019)

The Project:

Richard Tindle: Faculty of Business, Justice and Behavioural Sciences, School of Psychology, CSU

Noella Mackenzie: Faculty of Arts and Education, School of Education, CSU

Mitchell Longstaff: School of Health and Human Sciences, Southern Cross University.

The research will:

  1. Replicate the Mangen, Anda, Oxborough, & Brønnick 2015 study with an extended sample and build on these earlier findings by using a more stringent method and generalisable sample.
  2. Compare students’ (aged 15+) memory, and comprehension of lecture content after taking notes by handwriting, typing (laptop and tablet), or not take any notes – just listening. This will identify what mode of note-taking is best for students to retain information.
  3. Examine the quality of note-taking and the fluency of handwriting and typing (e.g., speed). We will identify if students’ learning ability will benefit from improving their handwriting and typing skills within the classroom

Building adaptive expertise in the teaching of writing through deepening pedagogy, identifying teachable moments and evaluating impact (2019)

Project commissioned and funded by NSW Department of Education (DoE)

Best Advice: Leading learning improvement handwriting and keyboarding (2018)

Project commissioned by Department for Education and Child Development, S.A. 

Working Above Standard Project (WASP): A St Mary’s School, Myrtleford and CSU Research Collaboration (2017)

Project commissioned by St Mary’s School, Vic. 

Assessing Children as Effective Communicators in Childhood Education and Care: Literature Review (2017)

Project commissioned by the VCAA

Handwriting and Keyboarding in Year 7: Talking to Students and Teachers (2017)

A CSU and Trinity Anglican College (Albury) Research Collaboration

weWrite: writing in early primary education [weWrite: Kirjoittaminen ja  näppäintaito alkuopetuksessa] – 2016 in Finland

Supported by Charles Sturt University

Understanding  and supporting young writers (2015)

*Report, video for Early Childhood Professionals and Parents, and brochure for parents

Exploring  writing in year 1 (2013 – 2018)

Exploring writing in year 1 was launched with two separate  but connected projects in 2010. The first project involved an exploration of  writing in year 1 in Victoria and NSW. Samples of writing from 1700 year 1  children were gathered and analysed using an analysis tool developed for this  purpose.
Investigators: Dr Noella Mackenzie (CSU), Ass  Prof Janet Scull (Monash University), Dr Terry Bowles (University of Melbourne)  and Ms Lynne Munsie (NSW DEC)

In 2013  1000 samples were analysed to form base data for a number of publications.  Quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection and analysis are  applied to the studies outlined above.

Writing  analysis tool: The analysis tool used  in the study and has proven useful to teachers in  classrooms is available here.

0-3  Literacy Project (2015/2016)

Supported financially By Charles Sturt University

Becoming  a writer (2007- 2011)

Becoming a writer (in the first year of formal schooling) began in  2007 and had a particular focus on the relationship between talking, drawing  and early writing. An exciting professional outcome of the Becoming a Writer  Research has been the development of resources to be used by schools with  parents of children starting school.

<span>%d</span> bloggers like this: